Stress is simply a reaction to a stimulus that disturbs our physical or mental equilibrium. In other words, it's an omnipresent part of life. A stressful event can trigger the “fight-or-flight” response, causing hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol to surge through the body. A little bit of stress, known as “acute stress,” can be exciting—it keeps us active and alert. But long-term, or “chronic stress,” can have detrimental effects on health. You may not be able to control the stressors in your world, but you can alter your reaction to them.

Recent posts on Stress

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6 Tips for Managing Strong Emotions in the Moment

By Tara Well Ph.D. on January 19, 2017 in The Clarity
Upset by the news? Try these strategies to stay informed without getting triggered.

10 Ways to Cope With Big Changes

Change will happen in life—it always does. So how can you go through change and come out even better than before? These 10 tips will show you how.
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10 New Strategies for Stress Management

By Ryan M. Niemiec Psy.D. on January 19, 2017 in What Matters Most?
Stress management is a popular topic, but can you list off 10 strategies that are research-based? Did you know that your inner capacities can be boosted to help with each one?

Opioid Abuse May Be Fueling a Heroin Epidemic

By Eric Newhouse on January 19, 2017 in Invisible Wounds
Prescriptions for painkillers like OxyContin have soared in recent years, then dropped way back. Some who became addicted to opioids are now believed to be turning to heroin.

7 Ways to Cope With Narcissists at Work

There's a pretty good chance that you have a narcissist in your workplace. Follow these steps to protect yourself.
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Important News on the Fair Labor Standards Act and Overtime

By Alan A. Cavaiola Ph.D. on January 18, 2017 in Beyond Bullying
Make sure you are getting your share.

The Brain Can Work Against Abuse Victims

By Rhonda Freeman Ph.D. on January 18, 2017 in NeuroSagacity
The neurochemistry of love and attachment, particularly in the presence of abuse, can seal a victim to a grim future with a malignant partner.

Help, I Don’t Speak Limbic

By Stuart Shanker DPhil on January 18, 2017 in Self-Reg
The better we can recognize which state teens are in, rational or limbic, the better we can understand and respond to what they are saying and doing.

3 Ways To Better Cope With Inauguration Panic

Many people are in a state of panic about the upcoming American presidential inauguration on Friday. While there are no simple answers, these 3 strategies may help you cope better.

Stress at Work

By John Sean Doyle on January 17, 2017 in Luminous Things
In our modern lives, we no longer need to worry about predators yet we are stressed all the time. There are things you can do.

Why Worry About Undercared for Males? Messed up Morals!

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on January 15, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
“Boys will be boys” is passed between adults when they throw up their hands and give up on socializing males. It turns out that male misconduct is a sign of undercare in babyhood.

High Stress Job? Warning: You Might Die Prematurely!

By Douglas LaBier Ph.D. on January 14, 2017 in The New Resilience
It's long been known that too little control and autonomy in your work can erode your health and wellbeing. But now that's found to lead to early death as well.

Edgy Goal Setting

SMART goals are a great idea. But how do you actually implement them? Interval Goal Setting is a straightforward way to use your own performance to set new goals.

Got Inflammation? 20 Minutes of Exercise Could Be a Remedy

By Christopher Bergland on January 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that short 20-minute bouts of walking at a moderate pace can boost your body's immune response and trigger anti-inflammatory responses.
Peter Bregman

Execution Is a People Problem, Not a Strategy Problem

By Peter Bregman on January 12, 2017 in How We Work
Your organization’s biggest strategic challenge isn’t strategic thinking—it’s strategic acting.

The Evolutionary Psychology of Divorce

Why does divorce wreak such havoc on people’s lives? For the same reason that high levels of processed foods cause health problems—divorce is not evolutionarily natural.

How Feelings Are Controlled When Flying

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on January 11, 2017 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Since cognition collapses when stress hormones rise too high, cognitive strategies fail when turbulence bombards fearful fliers with stress hormones.

Why Growth Most Often Occurs When We Fall Apart

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on January 11, 2017 in Standard Deviations
An introduction to the theory of positive disintegration and why adversity is so important in developing character.
Used by permission from rogoreport.com

Road Rage Revisited

By Steve Albrecht DBA on January 09, 2017 in The Act of Violence
Road rage is getting worse and more dangerous. Road ragers and their victims need help to cope in different ways.

Trusting Your Gut: Maybe It's Not What You Think

Have you ever used logic to make an important decision and ended up feeling you made the wrong choice? Maybe using your gut is the way to get an answer you won't doubt.

Be Worried About Boys, Especially Baby Boys

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on January 08, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
Parental toughness toward babies is celebrated as “not spoiling the baby” and not making boys into "sissies." A review of neurobiological research shows these are fallacies.
Source: Kristin A. Meekhof

Yes, It is Possible To Die From A Broken Heart

Yes, Broken Heart Syndrome Is An Actual Medical Condition

The Pain of Leadership Change

By Aneesh Singla M.D. on January 07, 2017 in Why It Hurts
Experiencing Post-Election Pain? You're Not Alone.
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Talking to Children About Death

What should we tell our children?

Warm Hands, Warm Heart

Want to build relationships? Order rounds of toasty and tasty beverages for all!
DepositPhotos/VIA Institute

A New Tool for Stress Management in the "New Year"

By Ryan M. Niemiec Psy.D. on January 06, 2017 in What Matters Most?
We all experience stress and this time of year can be particularly challenging for many. Learn a science-based approach to help you become better at stress management.

Carrie Fisher: Turning Problems into Punchlines

By Judy Carter on January 06, 2017 in Stress Is a Laughing Matter
Carrie Fisher was able to turn mental illness into a career. In so doing, she helped so many “come out” about their own secrets. Can laughter really help heal mental illness?

New Year but Same Feelings

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on January 06, 2017 in Minority Report
The presidential election has come and gone, but for many the lingering feelings of fear, doubt, and anxiety remain. What are you to do with them?

Do Extroverts Manage Stress Better?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on January 05, 2017 in The Human Beast
Our society favors extroverts as the outgoing individuals who discover continents and sell stuff and they may be better at managing stress also. So why did introversion evolve?

Acute Stress May Block a Key Anxiety-Relieving Neuropeptide

By Christopher Bergland on January 04, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
What causes stress-induced anxiety and PTSD to spiral out of control? New research suggests the answer may lie in a mysterious self-produced molecule called "neuropeptide Y."